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Having a good security guard resume may be the last thing you think about when preparing for your career.

As a security guard, you are tasked with protecting merchandise and customers from criminal activity.

It’s not a glamorous role, but it’s a vital and necessary one.

In order to land a job as a guard, you’ll have to demonstrate your experience and expertise to potential employers.

You’ll have to show them your key skill areas.

You’ll have to show them what security jobs you’ve held in the past.

All of this will be communicated through your resume, but first you have to write it.

That’s where we come in!

We’re going to show you all you need to know about good resume writing.

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample security guard resume to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best security guard resume you possibly can.

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Security Guard Resume (Text Version)

Contact Info:

Jim Johnson
[email protected]
(404) 790-7650
Atlanta, GA 30311
linkedin.com/jjohnson

Summary Statement:

Security Guard: Experienced Security Guard with proven ability to adapt quickly in fast-paced environments. Ensures safety of patrons and communicates effectively when issues may arise. Expertise in surveillance monitoring and security regulations. Demonstrates strong leadership and team player capabilities.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • Safety & Security
  • Surveillance Monitoring
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Detail-Oriented
  • Decision-Making
  • Security Training
  • Written & Verbal Communication

Professional Experience:

T.J. Maxx | Atlanta, GA
Security Officer | July 2016 – Present

  • Oversee company merchandise and identify potential theft threats
  • Conduct audits in order to assess store inventory
  • Facilitate training for team members in order to create awareness on loss prevention

Cumberland Mall | Atlanta, GA
Security Guard | June 2013 – July 2016

  • Patrolled parking lot and store interior to detect signs of theft
  • Connected with patrons to share information related to safety rules and regulations
  • Trained fellow security guard staff on company protocols and procedures
  • Identified potential areas of risk and made recommendations for new and improved security measures

Kmart | Atlanta, GA
Security Guard | January 2012 – May 2013

  • Investigated suspicious activities and documented all incident reports for company protocol purposes
  • Monitored all store surveillance cameras while managing other daily responsibilities
  • Communicated with police officers in the event of an emergency to ensure the safety of guests

Education

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

UNC Chapel Hill
December 2011

Formatting

In today’s job market, there are unique challenges to overcome with your resume.

This is why good and proper formatting is a must.

One hurdle to get over involves the use of scanning bots by companies and employers.

These bots scan resumes for proper keywords and language.

If your resume gets past the bots it will go on to be read by a hiring manager.

But get this, a hiring manager will only spend 6 seconds giving your resume a look over – not much time at all!

So two of your main goals should be to make your resume scannable and readable.

In order to assure good readability and to create proper emphasis, reverse chronological order should be your layout of choice.

This layout will place your most recent position first, which is what you want since employers are always searching for how you’ve been utilizing your skills in the present.

When preparing to write your security guard resume, choose a good font without frills. Just something common and easy to read.

Also make sure that your text and columns are evenly spaced. You want your white spaces looking balanced with your content.

Writing Your Resume Summary

It’s important to introduce your skills on your security guard resume.

You’ll do this by crafting a summary of your top skills and qualifications.

Since this is your opening, you want it to make an impression. So take time and really consider what makes you good at what you do.

What kind of security guard are you?

Your summary should be 2-3 sentences in length. It’s not a lengthy paragraph, but it should emphasize the essentials about your professional value.

PRO TIP: Your summary is your first impression, it frames the rest of your resume and introduces your skill set. You’ll need to demonstrate later on how you’ve used those skills on the job. So keep that in mind as you draft your summary.

Let’s review some summary examples:

Yes!

Experienced Security Guard with proven ability to adapt quickly in fast-paced environments. Ensures safety of patrons and communicates effectively when issues may arise. Expertise in surveillance monitoring and security regulations. Demonstrates strong leadership and team player capabilities.

No!

Security Guard who is quick on my feet. I watch customers like a hawk. I know all about security and the rules. I’m a good talker and make sure that me and the other guards are on the same page.

The first example demonstrates ability and a strong skill set. The candidate talks about areas of expertise and adds enough detail.

Power words like “ensures” and “demonstrates” strengthen the language and add a sense of action and competence.

The second example is poorly worded and informal in its language.

There is not enough specific detail included to gain an idea of the candidate’s skill-set and qualifications.

Remember that your summary is only as effective as you make it with your word choice and language.

So don’t let yourself and your skills down with a clumsily-worded summary!

Areas of Expertise/Key Accomplishments

Your skills are what set you apart from other candidates.

They make you unique – so it’s important to emphasize them on your security guard resume.

Follow your summary with a bulleted list of your Key Accomplishments, or Areas of Expertise.

Example:

  • Safety & Security
  • Surveillance Monitoring
  • Decision-Making
  • Leadership & Training
  • Written & Verbal Communication
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Detail-Oriented

This should be a list of both your Hard skills and Soft skills.

Hard skills reflect the skills of your job as a security guard – the things you do on a day to day basis. More pointedly, the skills you are best at.

Soft skills extend from your personality and temperament. They encompass qualities like communication ability, organizational skills, and your ability to work with a team.

Your list should be balanced between the two skill types.

Make sure you get all your relevant skills onto your list!

PRO TIP: In considering your skill set, think of ways in which you’ve stood apart from your peers at various jobs. What were you praised for? What qualities did your coworkers notice or clients point out about you?

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested hard and soft skill ideas to inspire you in writing your skills section.)

Writing Your Work Experience

Your actual work experience will probably be the central focus of your security guard resume.

This section is where you show how you’ve used your skills on the job over time.

Potential employers will want to know all about how you’ve acquitted yourself in your former positions.

It is the clearest indication of how you’ll perform should you be hired.

So how do you begin writing your work experience?

Remember that reverse chronological order is the proper layout option because it puts your most recent job first.

After that, work backwards through your former jobs, listing each one with a proper heading.

Be sure to include:

  • The company name
  • Where the company is located
  • What job you performed there

Add dates of employment as well, unless you have a really good reason not to. Reasons would include a short term of employment or significant time gaps between positions.

Keep in mind, however, that you will be asked about any missing dates within an interview situation. Employers want to know if you can hold a job down or how tenacious you are about seeking a job when you don’t have one. So be ready with answers should you leave dates off your resume!

Next you’ll use 3-5 bullet points to list the specifics of your former positions – the tasks you did day to day.

Include power words to strengthen your descriptions with a sense of action and ability.

Here are a few examples to look at:

Yes!

T.J. Maxx | Atlanta, GA | Security Officer | July 2016 – Present

  • Oversee company merchandise and identify potential theft threats
  • Conduct audits in order to assess store inventory
  • Facilitate training for team members in order to create awareness on loss prevention

No!

T.J. Maxx | Guard

  • Watched out for thieves
  • Counted store products to see if they were all there
  • Helped show members how to watch out for stealing

The first example is brief, but provides enough information about the position to gain an idea of the candidate’s competence within it.

This is a responsible candidate with solid leadership skills.

Relevant power words are used to good effect.

The second example lacks important details and does not present an adequate view of the candidate’s responsibilities and key skills in practice.

Power words are used but they are not supported.

Each entry should provide an overall snapshot of your time in the position.

PRO TIP: Check the job description for good power word ideas!

More About Bots

It is now common for employers to use an Applicant Tracking System (ATS) to scan resumes.

If you’re particularly worried about an ATS, consider a formatting alteration to your work experience section.

Use a paragraph instead of bullet points to talk about your former positions.

So instead of this:

T.J. Maxx | Atlanta, GA | Security Officer | July 2016 – Present

  • Oversee company merchandise and identify potential theft threats
  • Conduct audits in order to assess store inventory
  • Facilitate training for team members in order to create awareness on loss prevention

Try this:

Oversee company merchandise and identify potential theft threats. Conduct audits in order to assess store inventory. Facilitate training for team members in order to create awareness about loss prevention.

Or try a mixed formatting with limited bullet points to highlight certain roles and responsibilities.

Oversee company merchandise and identify potential theft threats. Conduct audits in order to assess store inventory. Facilitate training for team members in order to create awareness about loss prevention.

  • Helped to limit thefts by 50% annually during tenure.
  • Received commendation from store managers for exceptional job performance

A paragraph permits you to insert more keywords and varied language into your descriptions, which will help satisfy and ATS.

However, it will make your security guard resume harder to read for a hiring manager. Hopefully, your summary and skills list will help them overlook this, but you might not want to take that chance.

Overall, it is usually best to stick with a bullet point format.

Writing Your Education Section

What training did you undergo to become a security guard?

Did you complete a program?

Do you have any degrees or certifications?

The education section of your resume provides an important foundation for selling your skills to potential employers.

They will want to know the details of your education.

So start with the highest level earned.

Example: Master’s Degree, Bachelor’s Degree, High School Diploma, etc.

List the institution(s) you were educated at, your area of study, and other pertinent information.

To help heighten your value as a candidate, consider adding your GPA and other academic accomplishments.

Example:

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

UNC Chapel Hill
GPA: 4.0
December 2011

Include ways in which you’ve expanded your qualifications/training over time.

Example:

  • “Security Today,” Professional Workshop, Atlanta, GA
  • “Taser Safety,” Certification, Training Course, Atlanta, GA

Additional Section

If you have an additional achievement or skill to highlight, you may add an extra section to your resume.

This can prove helpful if you lack relevant work experience as well.

Consider adding sections such as:

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

No Experience

If you’re just starting out in the field of security work, you’re not going to have much in the way of practical experience to write about on your resume.

But that’s okay!

Let’s emphasize your education/training instead, because until you gain more focused experience, your education is going to be your primary value point.

You’ll still need to write about what jobs you have held, but consider carefully how they might have prepared you for security work.

How?

Think of the skills you acquired at each of your jobs.

Now think of how those skills might prove useful or relevant to you in your current professional pursuit.

Have you ever held a job that required diligence and observation?

How about night shifts or inventory tracking?

Are you accustomed to client interactions and communicating with employers?

These skills and responsibilities could prove useful, so include them on your resume!

Points to Remember

Number one, always include your contact details!

After all, it does no good if your resume is great but they don’t have a way to reach you – so jot down your email, LinkedIn, or phone number.

Spacing

Good use of spacing is important for your security guard resume. Start with a summary, then work history, and end with your education (depending on your situation). This will help keep your content organized and on point.

Power words

Power words will help elevate your writing above the mundane. You do want to stand out from the pack. Strong language supports strong qualifications.

Proofreading

Acquire a trusted proofreader to give your resume a look over once you’ve finished writing. Chances are they will catch a few mistakes, giving you an opportunity to polish up your document before sending it off!

“Don’ts” to Remember

A few words of advice:

Don’t use first person

It’s not good practice to use “I” or “me” in your resume language. It’s too informal and takes the emphasis off of your skills.

Don’t exceed one page

One page is easy to read and easy to handle. Your skills should fit nicely. If not, then edit!

Don’t repeat yourself

Repetition bores the reader and will do you no favors. Take time with your writing to assure variation in your language. Power words will help you with this.

(We’ve put together a handy table of power words below to use for inspiration.)

Don’t use crazy fonts or formatting

Hiring managers don’t award points for originality, so avoid odd fonts or outlandish formatting. Keep your resume looking clean, tidy, and above all, readable!

Some Helpful Tools:

Security Guard Resume Power Words

  • Oversee
  • Conduct
  • Facilitate
  • Patrolled
  • Connected
  • Trained
  • Identified
  • Investigated
  • Monitored
  • Communicated

Security Guard Resume Skills List

Hard Skills Soft Skills
Safety and Security Detail Oriented
Surveillance Monitoring Conflict Resolution
Security Training Decision Making
Google Drive Written and Verbal Communication